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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all. Brand new forum member here. I've reserved an Amazon Grey 2022 Tucson Ultimate Hybrid (Canada), and it's forecasted to arrive at the dealer in early June 2021.
For those who already own/drive a 2022 Tucson, is there a setting option in Vehicle Settings that's called "Walk Away Lock"? This setting is available (in certain markets) on the 2021 Palisade, and I'm wondering if it's available on the 2022 Tucson for North America. Note that I'm unable to find/download the Infotainment Manual from online sources for the 2022 Tucson.
Thanks, Richard
 

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I have the Tucson Hybrid Limited version in the US and I did not see that Walk-away Lock feature. There is a feature that can be set to Lock upon moving the gear selector from Park to any drive mode. Theoretically, the Walk-away feature could be added as a software update, but I wouldn't count on it since it wouldn't then match their already printed owners manual. Hopefully, Hyundai & other mfgrs catch up to Tesla with the ability to add features on the fly without boxing themselves in with a printed user manual.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
@Crow, thanks for your reply. I'm guessing the Walk-Away Lock feature is a Settings option only available in certain markets, with North America not being one of them. There may be an OBD2 Reader/Scanner "hack" for this (i.e. to gain access to an otherwise hidden menu) which I'll need to investigate. ;)
By the way... how are you liking your Tucson Hybrid Limited so far? All good? Any complaints/negatives?
Also.. did your Tucson come with an Infotainment Manual? I just want to confirm that one exists!
 

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I like it. There's more to like than dislike and it's a significant cut above the Rav4 and CR-V, and this comes from a guy who has owned Toyotas for 40 years. Here are some of the things I like:

  • Sport Driving Mode
  • Excellent interior design
  • Excellent Display Screens
  • Excellent Cameras
  • Birdseye View
  • Lane change cluster display when using blinker
  • Smooth and Quiet Ride
  • Little highway road noise
  • EV-like operation under 25mph
  • Tesla-like short bursts when you need it
  • Homelink transmits a long distance
  • Excellent visibility
  • Excellent BT phone capability
  • Heated/cooled seats
  • Heated Steering wheel
  • Infotainment response (touch buttons better than expected)
  • Seat comfort & arm support
  • Rear seat comfort is excellent
  • Lock down rear seatbacks when in cargo mode
  • Passenger seat full electric range functionality
  • Comfortable front seats
  • Smart Cruise control (is well done but not perfect)
  • Bose Sound System (not great but very good)
  • Hidden Storage
  • Heated rear seats
  • Paddle shifters
  • Excellent sunroof
  • Digital Key (phone)
  • Digital Key (card)
  • Very good Turning Radius

Things I don't like so far:
  • The artificial noise ( VESS ) produced when driving in Reverse; quite obnoxious & embarrassing and can't be turned off or lowered. Apparently mandated in the US by the NTSB (or similar agency).
  • The Integrated Memory System (aka, Memory Seat button) only applies to the Driver Seat Position and does not integrate the outside mirrors (hard to understand this one).
  • No Wireless CarPlay & Android Auto (requires USB cable on higher end trim levels).
  • Only one USB port (the one closest to the driver) serves Android Auto, CarPlay, and USB stored Music. That means if two drivers use Android Auto and CarPlay respectively, it can be a bit annoying having to swap cables. Further, you can't listen to music on a USB stick unless it's plugged into the same port, meaning no AA or CarPlay while listening to that mode of music. This is a significant oversight on Hyundai's part.
  • No sunglasses holder.
  • No firmware wireless update capability (only downloaded files installed using old school USB).
  • No spare tire even though there's room for a donut if desired.
  • The lack of USB-C ports, the standard the industry is moving toward (this is minor).
  • Digital Key Card one-card limitation. Why?
  • Homelink garage door buttons require key in ON position. It's a safety feature but not everyone needs that level of safety. Maybe make this an option.
  • Digital Key "Phone" not yet supported by Apple's iOS (an Apple issue that may be resolved soon).
  • No Profile setting for Default Drive Mode. It always defaults to Eco Mode when vehicle is started.
  • Most cluster Themes lack a "digital speed" in the center of the analog speedometer as is done on the 2020 Sonata. Currently, only the Cube theme offers a digital display. Note, a digital speed can be displayed on the center of the cluster, but you lose other valuable info that could be displayed instead, like a compass or tire pressure monitor.
  • Cluster lacks "Current Outdoor Temperature" display.
I'm sure I'll have more opinions with more experience with the Tucson. Again, I like it and glad we bought it. It's just not perfect and then again, no car is. Look forward to your delivery, I think you'll like yours too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
@Crow, what a great detailed reply! Thanks! (y)
None of the items on your "Don't like so far" list has me too concerned.. and your "Like" list is extensive and impressive! Note that I provided comment in the other thread regarding your dislike items 3 and 4 (i.e. memory system and door unlocking).
I test-drove a Tucson Hybrid a few weeks ago and didn't notice it emitted any artificial noise when driving in Reverse, so that might be something mandated in the U.S. only? Not sure - maybe some Canadian owners can chime in on this.
Enjoy your new Tucson Hybrid Limited - thanks again!
Cheers Richard
 

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And by the way, yes, my Tucson Hybrid did come with an Owner's Manual and separate Infotainment System "Quick" Reference Guide that is likely over 200 pages.
135
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
^ Thanks for that. The Infotainment System Reference Guide may mention all the various Vehicle Settings options that are accessible through the Infotainment screen.
 

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I like it. There's more to like than dislike and it's a significant cut above the Rav4 and CR-V, and this comes from a guy who has owned Toyotas for 40 years. Here are some of the things I like:

  • Sport Driving Mode
  • Excellent Display Screens
  • Excellent Cameras
  • Birdseye View
  • Lane change cluster display when using blinker
  • Smooth and Quiet Ride
  • Little highway road noise
  • EV-like operation under 25mph
  • Tesla-like short bursts when you need it
  • Homelink transmits a long distance
  • Excellent visibility
  • Excellent BT phone capability
  • Heated/cooled seats
  • Heated Steering wheel
  • Infotainment response (touch buttons better than expected)
  • Seat comfort & arm support
  • Rear seat comfort is excellent
  • Passenger seat full electric range functionality
  • Comfortable front seats
  • Smart Cruise control (although frustrating at times)
  • Bose Sound System (not great but very good)
  • Hidden Storage
  • Heated rear seats
  • Paddle shifters
  • Excellent sunroof

Things I don't like so far:
  • The artificial noise produced when driving in Reverse; quite obnoxious & embarrassing and can't be turned off or lowered. Apparently mandated in the US by the NTSB (or similar agency).
  • No Wireless CarPlay & Android Auto
  • Memory Seat button does not control mirrors (this appears to be a defect in my vehicle)
  • Two Press Door Unlock feature does not work on my vehicle, again it appears to be a defect on my vehicle.
  • No sunglasses holder
  • No firmware wireless update capability (only downloaded files installed using old school USB)
  • Frustrating Smart Cruise Control that sometimes works then doesn't (could be my own inexperience, will update later).
  • No spare tire even though there's room for a donut if desired.
  • Dust magnet piano black center stack (after two days it already looks bad, especially with the pollen we have on the East Coast of the US.
  • The lack of USB-C ports, the standard the industry is moving toward (this is minor)
  • Cluster display use of icons, unfortunately I can't understand what most mean (written words in the selected language would have been better IMO).
  • The Menu system is extensive and deep. Although you'll ultimately figure the features out, Hyundai could have spent more time making the explanations more intuitive.

I'm sure I'll have more opinions with more experience with the Tucson. Again, I like it and glad we bought it. It's just not perfect and then again, no car is. Look forward to your delivery, I think you'll like yours too.
** I have a red 2022 limited and I can tell you that mine came with a spare tire (full size)
** Once I understood my cruise it wasn't any different that my previous cars, just a little frustrating until I understood it
** I don't think the memory seats are supposed to control the mirrors (at least in the non-hybrid).
 

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Does anybody know why when you press the #2 memory seat it doesn't move the seat, it will only move once you are in the vehicle and press the profile that matches that seat?
 

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Is there a way to display the Sirius station name on the main screen instead of that station number or how to actually change the opening display off of the weather/channel number?
 

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Does anybody know why when you press the #2 memory seat it doesn't move the seat, it will only move once you are in the vehicle and press the profile that matches that seat?
Each Profile (up to three total) allows the storage of two Memory Seat positions (for a total of up to six memorized driver seat positions). This means the Memory Seat buttons are dependent on the Profile currently in use.

In your example, if Seat Position 2 corresponding to Driver 1 was not set and you pressed that button, nothing would happen. If you change the Profile to Driver 2 and pressed the Seat Position 2 button, it would recall that driver seat position if it had been previously set.

If this is confusing, just remember to set up the User Profiles before attempting to establish the settings for each user. Memory Seat settings correspond to the User Profile (like all other settings) and are not independent. If you have two User Profiles, each user gets two Memory Seat Positions. In this case, you can duplicate the Memory Seat positions for each Profile so that Driver 1 always uses Memory Seat 1 and Driver 2 always uses Memory Seat 2. Just note, I don't think there's a way to copy the seat position from one Profile to another.

If you use only one User Profile and two drivers, then simply pick one Memory Seat button for each driver.
 

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I like it. There's more to like than dislike and it's a significant cut above the Rav4 and CR-V, and this comes from a guy who has owned Toyotas for 40 years. Here are some of the things I like:

  • Sport Driving Mode
  • Excellent interior design
  • Excellent Display Screens
  • Excellent Cameras
  • Birdseye View
  • Lane change cluster display when using blinker
  • Smooth and Quiet Ride
  • Little highway road noise
  • EV-like operation under 25mph
  • Tesla-like short bursts when you need it
  • Homelink transmits a long distance
  • Excellent visibility
  • Excellent BT phone capability
  • Heated/cooled seats
  • Heated Steering wheel
  • Infotainment response (touch buttons better than expected)
  • Seat comfort & arm support
  • Rear seat comfort is excellent
  • Passenger seat full electric range functionality
  • Comfortable front seats
  • Smart Cruise control (although frustrating at times)
  • Bose Sound System (not great but very good)
  • Hidden Storage
  • Heated rear seats
  • Paddle shifters
  • Excellent sunroof

Things I don't like so far:
  • The artificial noise produced when driving in Reverse; quite obnoxious & embarrassing and can't be turned off or lowered. Apparently mandated in the US by the NTSB (or similar agency).
  • The Integrated Memory System (aka, Memory Seat button) only applies to the Driver Seat Position and does not integrate the outside mirrors (hard to understand this one).
  • No Wireless CarPlay & Android Auto (requires USB cable on higher end trim levels).
  • No sunglasses holder.
  • No firmware wireless update capability (only downloaded files installed using old school USB).
  • Frustrating Smart Cruise Control that sometimes works then doesn't (could be my own inexperience, will update later).
  • No spare tire even though there's room for a donut if desired.
  • Dust magnet piano black center stack (after two days it already looks bad, especially with the pollen we have on the East Coast of the US.
  • The lack of USB-C ports, the standard the industry is moving toward (this is minor)
  • Cluster display use of icons, unfortunately I can't understand what most mean (written words in the selected language would have been better IMO).
  • The Menu system is extensive and deep. Although you'll ultimately figure the features out, Hyundai could have spent more time making the explanations more intuitive.

I'm sure I'll have more opinions with more experience with the Tucson. Again, I like it
audio
I had the same question re. no wireless Android Auto/Apple Carplay. However, it does make sense. The Bluetooth connection to android/apple works great for any audio functions like music or audiobooks with full pause/fast forward-reverse/skip still available on the infotainment screen. The only functions you really lose with that are maps/navigation and that is included with the Limited model so they would likely interfere with each other.
 

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I like it. There's more to like than dislike and it's a significant cut above the Rav4 and CR-V, and this comes from a guy who has owned Toyotas for 40 years. Here are some of the things I like:

  • Sport Driving Mode
  • Excellent interior design
  • Excellent Display Screens
  • Excellent Cameras
  • Birdseye View
  • Lane change cluster display when using blinker
  • Smooth and Quiet Ride
  • Little highway road noise
  • EV-like operation under 25mph
  • Tesla-like short bursts when you need it
  • Homelink transmits a long distance
  • Excellent visibility
  • Excellent BT phone capability
  • Heated/cooled seats
  • Heated Steering wheel
  • Infotainment response (touch buttons better than expected)
  • Seat comfort & arm support
  • Rear seat comfort is excellent
  • Passenger seat full electric range functionality
  • Comfortable front seats
  • Smart Cruise control (although frustrating at times)
  • Bose Sound System (not great but very good)
  • Hidden Storage
  • Heated rear seats
  • Paddle shifters
  • Excellent sunroof

Things I don't like so far:
  • The artificial noise produced when driving in Reverse; quite obnoxious & embarrassing and can't be turned off or lowered. Apparently mandated in the US by the NTSB (or similar agency).
  • The Integrated Memory System (aka, Memory Seat button) only applies to the Driver Seat Position and does not integrate the outside mirrors (hard to understand this one).
  • No Wireless CarPlay & Android Auto (requires USB cable on higher end trim levels).
  • No sunglasses holder.
  • No firmware wireless update capability (only downloaded files installed using old school USB).
  • Frustrating Smart Cruise Control that sometimes works then doesn't (could be my own inexperience, will update later).
  • No spare tire even though there's room for a donut if desired.
  • Dust magnet piano black center stack (after two days it already looks bad, especially with the pollen we have on the East Coast of the US.
  • The lack of USB-C ports, the standard the industry is moving toward (this is minor)
  • Cluster display use of icons, unfortunately I can't understand what most mean (written words in the selected language would have been better IMO).
  • The Menu system is extensive and deep. Although you'll ultimately figure the features out, Hyundai could have spent more time making the explanations more intuitive.

I'm sure I'll have more opinions with more experience with the Tucson. Again, I like it and glad we bought it. It's just not perfect and then again, no car is. Look forward to your delivery, I think you'll like yours too.
Since I referenced Smart Cruise Control in an earlier post, my mild frustration was due to my inexperience with Hyundai's system. It's an impressive driving system that unfortunately isn't foolproof. For those of you who have experience using the system, what I'm about to say is obvious. For others with less experience, this may be helpful:

Hyundai's semi-autonomous driving system is made up of multiple subsystems including:
  • Lane Following Assist
  • Lane Keep Assist
  • Collision Avoidance Assist
  • Smart Cruise Control
  • Highway Driving Assist
Understanding each of these components and tailoring the corresponding settings for each to your preference, along with understanding how the cameras, blind spot sensors, and radar systems work together will help you make the best use of the driving system. When all of these subsystems are enabled, the vehicle can almost drive itself under favorable conditions. Those conditions include highway driving where lanes are clearly marked and traffic is generally moving consistently. In fact, if few cars are around, the system won't warn you to put your hands on the wheel. The more crowded traffic gets, the greater the frequency of warnings.

Although some use Smart Cruise Control even in bumper to bumper traffic, it's a bit too risky for me. That's a personal choice, but, enabling some of the other subsystems based on traffic conditions is an option. As you get more familiar with the system, you'll know what features work best for your driving style.

I'm of the opinion that we won't see full autonomous driving vehicles over the next many years for multiple reasons. And I personally hardly use any of the systems mentioned above except when driving long distances on a highway. However, my wife does use it all and it provides her with a higher level of driving confidence.

I'm sure Tesla has more advanced driving assistance algorithms and hardware, but, Hyundai has done a pretty nice job. There's certainly room for improvement including upgraded cameras and AI to better predict lane paths, as well as lane "centering" that is smart enough to skew vehicles within the lane but away from obstacles like oncoming vehicles. It's only going to get better and is worth taking the time to understand each of the systems Hyundai employs on the new Tucson. Well done.
 

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Things I don't like so far:
  • The artificial noise produced when driving in Reverse; quite obnoxious & embarrassing and can't be turned off or lowered. Apparently mandated in the US by the NTSB (or similar agency).
  • The Integrated Memory System (aka, Memory Seat button) only applies to the Driver Seat Position and does not integrate the outside mirrors (hard to understand this one).
  • No Wireless CarPlay & Android Auto (requires USB cable on higher end trim levels).
  • Only one USB port (the one closest to the driver) serves Android Auto, CarPlay, and USB stored Music. That means if two drivers use Android Auto and CarPlay respectively, it can be a bit annoying having to swap cables. Further, you can't listen to music on a USB stick unless it's plugged into the same port, meaning no AA or CarPlay while listening to that mode of music. This is a significant oversight on Hyundai's part.
  • No sunglasses holder.
  • No firmware wireless update capability (only downloaded files installed using old school USB).
  • No spare tire even though there's room for a donut if desired.
  • Dust magnet piano black center stack.
  • The lack of USB-C ports, the standard the industry is moving toward (this is minor).
  • Digital Key Card one-card limitation. Why?
  • Homelink garage door buttons require key in ON position. It's a safety feature but not everyone needs that level of safety. Maybe make this an option.
Thanks for pointing this big oversight. I also noticed this when I took delivery of the car.

I am one of the few people who actually still use a USB drive for music. Thankfully I don't really use android auto. Maybe I'll use it if/when Hyundai updates the 10.25" inch screen version.

But they could have made both front USB ports have the ability to communicate with the infotainment.
 

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As an FYI, the USB music appears to require mp3s to be stored in the root folder. If music is placed in multiple folders, Hyundai ignores all folders except for the first one it finds and loops only thru mp3s in that folder. Quite primative.
 

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As an FYI, the USB music appears to require mp3s to be stored in the root folder. If music is placed in multiple folders, Hyundai ignores all folders except for the first one it finds and loops only thru mp3s in that folder. Quite primative.
I have been able to play folders and I purposely put one set of files in the root. That's where they first started playing, but I was able to navigate through and play within the folders.
 

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I have been able to play folders and I purposely put one set of files in the root. That's where they first started playing, but I was able to navigate through and play within the folders.
I'll try again. It didn't work that way for me during testing it. I'll report back.
 

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I like it. There's more to like than dislike and it's a significant cut above the Rav4 and CR-V, and this comes from a guy who has owned Toyotas for 40 years. Here are some of the things I like:

  • Sport Driving Mode
  • Excellent interior design
  • Excellent Display Screens
  • Excellent Cameras
  • Birdseye View
  • Lane change cluster display when using blinker
  • Smooth and Quiet Ride
  • Little highway road noise
  • EV-like operation under 25mph
  • Tesla-like short bursts when you need it
  • Homelink transmits a long distance
  • Excellent visibility
  • Excellent BT phone capability
  • Heated/cooled seats
  • Heated Steering wheel
  • Infotainment response (touch buttons better than expected)
  • Seat comfort & arm support
  • Rear seat comfort is excellent
  • Passenger seat full electric range functionality
  • Comfortable front seats
  • Smart Cruise control (is well done but not perfect)
  • Bose Sound System (not great but very good)
  • Hidden Storage
  • Heated rear seats
  • Paddle shifters
  • Excellent sunroof
  • Digital Key (phone)
  • Digital Key (card)
  • Very good Turning Radius

Things I don't like so far:
  • The artificial noise produced when driving in Reverse; quite obnoxious & embarrassing and can't be turned off or lowered. Apparently mandated in the US by the NTSB (or similar agency).
  • The Integrated Memory System (aka, Memory Seat button) only applies to the Driver Seat Position and does not integrate the outside mirrors (hard to understand this one).
  • No Wireless CarPlay & Android Auto (requires USB cable on higher end trim levels).
  • Only one USB port (the one closest to the driver) serves Android Auto, CarPlay, and USB stored Music. That means if two drivers use Android Auto and CarPlay respectively, it can be a bit annoying having to swap cables. Further, you can't listen to music on a USB stick unless it's plugged into the same port, meaning no AA or CarPlay while listening to that mode of music. This is a significant oversight on Hyundai's part.
  • No sunglasses holder.
  • No firmware wireless update capability (only downloaded files installed using old school USB).
  • No spare tire even though there's room for a donut if desired.
  • The lack of USB-C ports, the standard the industry is moving toward (this is minor).
  • Digital Key Card one-card limitation. Why?
  • Homelink garage door buttons require key in ON position. It's a safety feature but not everyone needs that level of safety. Maybe make this an option.
  • Digital Key "Phone" not yet supported by Apple's iOS (an Apple issue that may be resolved soon).
  • No Profile setting for Default Drive Mode. It always defaults to Eco Mode when vehicle is started.
  • Add more Themes that include a Digital speedometer. Currently, only the Cube theme offers a digital display.
I'm sure I'll have more opinions with more experience with the Tucson. Again, I like it and glad we bought it. It's just not perfect and then again, no car is. Look forward to your delivery, I think you'll like yours too.
 

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Hi, enjoyed your list, I would add the ability of adjusting sport mode screen with a tach is a nice touch. I'm still trying to figure out the nav system, meeting with my sales rep to learn about the tire inflator kit and other features.

Was the software update easy to install?
 
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