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2022 Tucson PHEV Limited trim (March 2022)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

There’s a lot of discussion on this topic already but I’m not finding satisfying answers (maybe there isn’t any…).

I’ve had my Tucson PHEV for a month now, great car, absolutely love it. However, I am a bit unhappy with the EV mode: the ICE keeps kicking in more often than I’d expected (by far). I read multiple threads on here (and searched Google for articles) they all say it’s to be expected with A/C or heater on, or upon kicking the gas pedal a bit hard. I understand all the explanations and they make sense.

However my other car is a Chevy Volt Gen 2 and I can tell you it NEVER uses the engine (to charge the battery — which is the only thing that engine does on the Volt). I can hit the gas as hard as I want, even in Sport mode, I stay in EV only. When I got the car in 2017, I did not put a drop of gas until I hit 3,000 miles (just for fun…)

Note that there is a difference in the Tucson in EV mode vs. HEV mode: when the ICE kicks in in EV mode, it’s only to boost the battery, the traction remains from the electric motor (as demonstrated by the little power flow animation on the dash), which is somewhat reassuring. But still, I don’t understand why it’s not possible to just use EV when temp control is on (I could potentially accept the steep acceleration exception, and remain gentle there if I want to stay in EV). And it’s ok if I didn’t get 33 miles of EV range with temp control. This is something Hyundai could easily allow by firmware. It’s just annoying that, in cold or hot weather, during a 10-15 min trip, I basically drive a gas car… Frankly, I don’t even understand that California would give it the HOV sticker (which it does, I just applied).

Thanks for reading and sharing any consideration.
 

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2022 Tucson PHEV Limited trim (March 2022)
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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
To clarify: on the Volt, there is obviously also a way to be off EV mode, but my example above was about its behavior in electric only mode.
 

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2022 Tucson PHEV Limited trim (March 2022)
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I’ve only had the car for a month, so it’s hard to tell for sure. It seems to me that, yes, it’s a bit challenging to stay in pure EV. It seems possible based on what I’ve read and on my own testing.

Conditions ti stay in EV seem to be:

1) Limit climate control (heated seats and wheel don’t seem to trigger ICE, only the heater and A/C do and only in cold and hot temperatures- if it’s not too bad, climate control won’t trip the ICE)

2) Be gentle on the gas pedal (if you accelerate hard, whether at low speeds or high speeds) ICE will kick in to give the battery a boost (although what’s funny is that it charges the battery but doesn’t actually move the car - which is what the ICE does in HEV mode. In EV, the ICE comes on only to boost the charge of the battery, which is interesting)

3) (This I need to test more but) it seems that with a fully charged battery the car is less likely to kick in the ICE. I haven’t found the break point or a more precise predictable pattern but even with climate control, it seems that the ICE kicks in less often with a full charge than say, with 1/4 charge left.

Anyway, I don’t find this a huge deal breaker, I love the car all around. Just a mild disappointment compared to my old (2017) Volt Gen 2. I guess I was a bit spoiled…

Cheers,
Ph
 

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2022 Tuscon PHEV Luxury Amazon Grey
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I have also had my PHEV for about a month now and after some initial troubles, have been able to be consistently driving in EV only:

Climate control has been completely off, only heated and ventilated seats or heated steering wheel has been used (however its my understanding that AC to cool the cabin should not necessitate the gas motor)

In the instrument cluster, on the right you have a gauge that shows a range from Charge > Eco > Power depending on how hard you press the gas pedal or if you are braking. If you keep the dial in Eco mode, the gas engine will not turn on. If you have a lead foot, this will definitely be an issue :D Keep in mind that the elctric motor has something like 90 horsepower, so it's amazing that a such a small motor can still drive such a heavy car and even push it on highway speeds.

The car will automatically go into hybrid mode when the battery life is under 15% (maybe 20%) and will turn on the gas engine periodically to charge the battery. So if you want full EV you don't really have the full range of 53km, more like 45km.
 

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I've had my PHEV (Canadian Luxury model) for about a month and half now. Part of the reason heating requires engine power is the Tucson has no heat pump. I don't know much about your Volt , does it? The other factor to keep in mind, just a quick search a Chevy volt Gen 2 weighs 1600 kg or just over 3500 pounds. The Tucson PHEV weighs in around 1900 kgs or close to 4200 pounds (curb weight). As you're aware, the electric motor isn't very big so if you really put your foot down it only makes sense the engine would fire up to deliver more power.

Personally this is my first PHEV. I had a turbo 1.6L Kona AWD before this and while it was super fun to drive it pissed gas out in city and traffic conditions. I'm over 1200 kms /750 miles on my current gas tank here in Quebec. My last fill was 2.5 weeks ago. Mornings are cold and afternoons are warmer basically requiring no climate , only windows. Without climate on you basically can keep the car in EV provided the battery is charged. I've had AC come on a few times. If I recall, I think once the gas engine turned on with AC but the other times it stayed put in EV.

I guess if you make comparisons to other PHEVs you can find flaws in the Tucson and vice versa. I find for a vehicle of this size, comfort and luxury it's pretty impressive the fuel savings you get as long as you keep yourself charged up. My 1.5 month of ownership i've spent $50 on gasoline. My kona by this point i'd be up over $250 minimum given the driving I do. You do have to factor in some electric costs but Quebec has some of the lowest rates anyway so it's minimal. Cheers
 

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2022 Tucson PHEV Limited trim (March 2022)
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks you @Tuscon_PHEV_Shopper and @Adamk ,

I hadn't thought of the weight difference, it's a good point. I wonder how a Rav4 Prime handles this EV-only mode (in case anyone knows).

Also agree this is a great car and compares very favorably. I got the Limited model here in the US and it is loaded. Even the Prime upper trim doesn't come with sunroof and high-end sound, so you have to add a special package. Overall I think the Tucson wound up being $8K USD less for similar level. And it's much better looking (in my opinion) :) The front grill, the back light, the side designs, really bold and appealing. Which was a big part in my decision too, along with lower cost.

Cheers.
 

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In common with several others here, I have noted the idiosyncrasies of the electric mode operation. Most of the time, if the climate control is off, you can expect to operate in EV mode provided you do not demand the quickest acceleration. However, there are occasions where the system decides that the gas engine needs a run anyway. I speculate that this is because if you did not have even a brief usage for the gas engine for weeks on end, that would be to its and the system's detriment. So I have noted that it may run for about 5 minutes and then we are back to EV mode. On the whole though, local driving, imho, is operating mainly on EV under the EV setting with gas usage minimal.
 

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2022 Tucson Limited PHEV Amazon Gray / Black. 2022 Tucson SEL PHEV Shimmering Silver / Gray
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In common with several others here, I have noted the idiosyncrasies of the electric mode operation. Most of the time, if the climate control is off, you can expect to operate in EV mode provided you do not demand the quickest acceleration. However, there are occasions where the system decides that the gas engine needs a run anyway. I speculate that this is because if you did not have even a brief usage for the gas engine for weeks on end, that would be to its and the system's detriment. So I have noted that it may run for about 5 minutes and then we are back to EV mode. On the whole though, local driving, imho, is operating mainly on EV under the EV setting with gas usage minimal.
I use eco mode most of the time and I have limited usage for the AC but the times i tried it the car stayed in EV and I know it does not have a fan belt to compressor so its electrically driven. It may for some other reason kick on the ICE but not just for AC usage. Totally happy with my purchase. When my ICE kicks in and I don't like it I pull over put in park and turn on then off and its back to EV so I don't have to wait for it to go through its cycling
 

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2) Be gentle on the gas pedal (if you accelerate hard, whether at low speeds or high speeds) ICE will kick in to give the battery a boost (although what’s funny is that it charges the battery but doesn’t actually move the car - which is what the ICE does in HEV mode. In EV, the ICE comes on only to boost the charge of the battery, which is interesting)
Are you sure about this? That doesn't make sense, because it would mean that the ICE is not providing horsepower to the powertrain. It makes more sense for it to be doing both (charging and providing horsepower).
 

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2022 Tucson PHEV Limited trim (March 2022)
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Are you sure about this? That doesn't make sense, because it would mean that the ICE is not providing horsepower to the powertrain. It makes more sense for it to be doing both (charging and providing horsepower).
@stargate125645 I am NOT sure. It was just an observation based on the little power flow animation on the dash. Check it out next time: if in EV mode and the ICE kicks in, the orange line flows only from the engine to the battery. But when in HEV mode, there are times where the orange line flows from the engine to the front wheels. Again, not a scientific method of deduction, just based on silly graphics :)
 

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2022 Tucson Limited PHEV Amazon Gray / Black. 2022 Tucson SEL PHEV Shimmering Silver / Gray
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Are you sure about this? That doesn't make sense, because it would mean that the ICE is not providing horsepower to the powertrain. It makes more sense for it to be doing both (charging and providing horsepower).
If you haveva limited model turn on the tachometer and watch whats happening
 

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2022 Tucson PHEV Limited trim (March 2022)
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I don't have a Tucson yet. This makes me question how the system functions, though. I don't want to buy it if the ICE doesn't provide hp when needed.
If you've driven an electric car, you'll have probably noticed that the EV motors provide plenty of traction. Reason why Tesla beats 0-60 record after record. So this shouldn't be a reason to deter you. But take a test-drive maybe (when availabilities become less problematic), best way to figure out if you like it.
 

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If you've driven an electric car, you'll have probably noticed that the EV motors provide plenty of traction. Reason why Tesla beats 0-60 record after record. So this shouldn't be a reason to deter you. But take a test-drive maybe (when availabilities become less problematic), best way to figure out if you like it.
I'm not sure that's an accurate comparison. An EV motor has significantly more power than the PHEV motor. If I could get a Tucson PHEV to test drive, I would do so. My only option may be a Sportage PHEV. I have test-driven an EV6.
 

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Oh I didn't think this was an option. Mind to tell me how to display the tachometer so I don't have to research it?
Oh I didn't think this was an option. Mind to tell me how to display the tachometer so I don't have to research it?
With the car on and in park
Setup
Vehicle
Cluster
Scroll to the bottom then
Tachometer Display the
Pick the modes you want the Tachometer to work on
 

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2022 Tuscon PHEV Luxury Amazon Grey
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@stargate125645 I am NOT sure. It was just an observation based on the little power flow animation on the dash. Check it out next time: if in EV mode and the ICE kicks in, the orange line flows only from the engine to the battery. But when in HEV mode, there are times where the orange line flows from the engine to the front wheels. Again, not a scientific method of deduction, just based on silly graphics :)
So what I beleive happens is that if you floor the gas pedal in EV mode, the gauge goes into the Power mode and turns on the gas engine, but since you must likely just needed a quick burst of energy after a few seconds the dial will go back into Eco. At this point, the system determines you don't need the gas engine to drive, but it likes to keep the gas engine going for a minute or two if it is turned on as its important for the health of the engine, so it ends up charging your battery 🙂

One thing to keep in mind, is that the gas engine is very very very inefficient when it starts up cold. I did a 20km drive and the engine turned on in the last minute and I ended up with 1l/100km for the trip to drive just a few hundred meters with the gas engine on.

I don't have a Tucson yet. This makes me question how the system functions, though. I don't want to buy it if the ICE doesn't provide hp when needed.
If you floor the gas pedal, you will get power from both the electric motor and the gas engine.

If you drive so that you are trying to stick to EV only it is definitely a bit slow, especially compared to a full EV like the Ev6! However, if you put the car into sport mode it is more than peppy enough for a family SUV. If you are looking to track your SUV I think you are looking at the wrong car haha Maybe take a look at the Ev6 GT 😍
 

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2022 Tucson PHEV Limited trim (March 2022)
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
I'm not sure that's an accurate comparison. An EV motor has significantly more power than the PHEV motor. If I could get a Tucson PHEV to test drive, I would do so. My only option may be a Sportage PHEV. I have test-driven an EV6.
Yes, I understand and you're right. The Tucson has a fairly small electric motor compared to pure EVs, but I have found it's quite punchy. If you really want the ICE's boost (which is a turbo, so more boost), you can select the Sport mode, which keeps the car in HEV mode (gas hybrid only, not EV). The car overall is advertised for 261 HP I believe, and for a bigger car (compared to my Volt) it's holding its own really well. I know it's hard to find a test-drive these days. I hope the supply situation eases up soon.
 

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Yes, I understand and you're right. The Tucson has a fairly small electric motor compared to pure EVs, but I have found it's quite punchy. If you really want the ICE's boost (which is a turbo, so more boost), you can select the Sport mode, which keeps the car in HEV mode (gas hybrid only, not EV). The car overall is advertised for 261 HP I believe, and for a bigger car (compared to my Volt) it's holding its own really well. I know it's hard to find a test-drive these days. I hope the supply situation eases up soon.
You can not compare Volt and Tucson because they work different ways
I had 2018 Volt and had test drive on Tucson PHEV ( ordered 2023 )
Volt works as pure EV because it has 150 hp Electric motor and once battery is empty than gasoline engine works as electro generator for el.motor.
Tucson phev works as hybrid and in cold weather you can not hold EV mode until car warm up battery system reach 70 degrees celsius ( or so ) than it can starts to work in EV mode only.
Hope this will help you to understand how it works
In summer time you will have almost all the time in EV mode if you dont floor gas pedal for about first 60 km
 
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