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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all,

I've been a Honda Civic owner for decades, but am now looking to get a Hyundai Tucson. Were it not for COVID, I probably would have bought one already. I have lurked on these forums for several weeks, and have decided to become a member and join the conversation.

Just before the Delta variant of COVID hit, I had had a chance to test drive a Tucson Limited HEV and was quite impressed with it. Unfortunately, I was only able to drive it in a noisy (city) area, so I didn't get a real feel for how quiet it might be. I have not had the opportunity to drive its plug-in counterpart at all.

Could anyone here who has driven both the HEV and the PHEV answer a few questions for me?
  • Is the PHEV much quieter than the HEV overall? Is one or the other appreciatively louder when the ICE kicks in?
  • Is the transition between the use of the battery alone and the ICE equally smooth in each of the vehicles?
  • How different does the braking feel with the PHEV in comparison to the HEV?
  • I've read that the MPG is slightly worse when the PHEV uses the ICE when compared to the HEV. Other than this and the answers to the above questions, have you noticed any other major differences between the two versions of the vehicle?
  • If you were to buy a new Tucson right now, knowing what you currently know about both versions, which would you buy and why?
Thanks to COVID and the associated supply shortages, etc., I will probably wait until the 2023 model comes out. (That will also give Hyundai a chance to iron out any kinks from the current year's version.) Even so, I am enjoying window shopping and dreaming about my next vehicle.

Thanks,
Lynn
 

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I think overall, waiting for the next model year to come out is a good idea. Look up the Kia Sportage hybrid coming out, it might give you a clue of what is to come.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hi Mungo544,

Thanks for the pointer to the upcoming Sportage. I like its internal aesthetics, and the larger, adjacent screens are sweet. I would love for the Tucson to adopt those aspects of the Sportage. I guess time will tell.

The video left me curious about more some performance aspects of the new hybrid. According to Kia's website, it is supposed to make 39MPG combined, and have 226HP and AWD.

If the Tucson is not available when I need it, or if it gets out of my price range, the Sportage hybrid is a vehicle I would look into further.

Thanks,
Lynn
 

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In Canada there is only $2500 extra to upgrade HEV to PHEV
No big deal to test new technology, get larger battery, get a preview of EV mode on the road.
people pay thousands for larger screens camera and other toys , but PHEV is real tech
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hello Pbm,

Thank you for your response.

The price difference is not the deal breaker for me; I'm just trying to find out what the relative subjective experience of driving the two models of the Tucson.

I can't road test the PHEV because there are personal circumstances which would make catching COVID extremely dangerous both for me and for my relatives; I am therefore social isolating as much as possible. Also, the PHEV isn't even sold in my state, and it would probably be very difficult to find it in stock to test drive even in the nearby states. I am therefore considering doing something I have never done in my life: Purchasing a car without having test-driven the model I am interested in. That is why I am asking questions on this site: to make as informed a decision as possible.

I have already researched many of the pros and cons (mostly pros) of the PHEV over the HEV. What I am asking for here is information that I have been unable to ascertain in my research. On paper, the PHEV looks far superior to the HEV, but if (for example) the regenerative brakes make slowing down very jerky, I want to know about that. Also, if my current car dies (it is well maintained, but it is twelve years old and has its share of miles) and the PHEV won't be available for some time, I want to know whether I should just buy the HEV or whether it would be worth getting a loaner until I can lay hands on the PHEV.

In normal times, I would simply test drive the PHEV and then order whichever model I preferred. Unfortunately, these times are anything but normal.

Joy,
Lynn
 

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I had test drove both models in Canada before I chose the PHEV. Having never had a HEV or PHEV before I had no idea what to expect when comparing them. For the most part I could not really tell the difference between the HEV and the PHEV. The ride was pretty much the same, the biggest difference was that the PHEV would go into EV mode and stay in EV mode and not run the engine at all where I found the HEV seemed to run the engine more often. In Canada, we get $2500 credit from the Goverment if we bought the PHEV that meant the vehicle only cost me $2100 more than the HEV. From me driving for the past month of so with it, back and forth to work on the highway (25 km each way) I have found that is costing me less than $1/day to charge it at home. Our rate for power with all the taxes is about 12 cents per kwhr. In the last 2 and a half weeks it has cost me $20 in gas to go 515km (gas is at $1.14 per litre). According to the vehicle since that last refill i am getting 2.6l/100km combined fuel economy. With my previous vehilce, a 2015 Lincoln MKC, which was about the same size and had a 2.3L turbo engine, I was easily spending between $30 and $35 per week for the same driving. For me it was a no brainer as I keep my vehicles for a long time and with what I am seeing so far for fuel economy the difference in price will pay for itself plus the fact that I am doing my part (in a little way) to cut fuel emissions. If there are any specifc questions please reach out and I can try to get you some answers.

I will say never having a Hyundai before, I was a Cadillac and Lincoln person, I am very very impressed with Hyundai and would not hesitate to tell anyone to purchase one.

Have an AWESOME day.
 

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Hello all,

I've been a Honda Civic owner for decades, but am now looking to get a Hyundai Tucson. Were it not for COVID, I probably would have bought one already. I have lurked on these forums for several weeks, and have decided to become a member and join the conversation.

Just before the Delta variant of COVID hit, I had had a chance to test drive a Tucson Limited HEV and was quite impressed with it. Unfortunately, I was only able to drive it in a noisy (city) area, so I didn't get a real feel for how quiet it might be. I have not had the opportunity to drive its plug-in counterpart at all.

Could anyone here who has driven both the HEV and the PHEV answer a few questions for me?
  • Is the PHEV much quieter than the HEV overall? Is one or the other appreciatively louder when the ICE kicks in?
  • Is the transition between the use of the battery alone and the ICE equally smooth in each of the vehicles?
  • How different does the braking feel with the PHEV in comparison to the HEV?
  • I've read that the MPG is slightly worse when the PHEV uses the ICE when compared to the HEV. Other than this and the answers to the above questions, have you noticed any other major differences between the two versions of the vehicle?
  • If you were to buy a new Tucson right now, knowing what you currently know about both versions, which would you buy and why?
Thanks to COVID and the associated supply shortages, etc., I will probably wait until the 2023 model comes out. (That will also give Hyundai a chance to iron out any kinks from the current year's version.) Even so, I am enjoying window shopping and dreaming about my next vehicle.

Thanks,
Lynn
Can’t give you the comparison data , but have about 1000 miles on my PHEV. The only way I know the ICE kicks in is from the dash indicators. Soo quiet. Love the vehicle!! For highway driving, the smart cruise with automatic adjust to allowed speed and lane keeping assist make the highway drives so much easier. I’ve made the 200 mile round trip to family 3 times in the last 2 weeks. The drive assist features are awesome traveling thru NY metro area traffic.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hello Kevinrobedm,

Thank you for your informative reply. My primary question remaining is whether the vehicle is a lot louder when using the ICE than when operating solely under battery power.

Since it sounds like the driving experience between the two models is very similar, I am strongly leaning toward the PHEV and will probably order one as soon as the 2023 model is up for pre-order. In addition to being more environmentally friendly and (I am guessing) quieter, it would let me hedge my bets regarding the relative prices of electricity and gasoline in the years to come. Thank you for helping me make an informed decision.

Joy,
Lynn
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Hello MLS,

Wow. That is impressive, especially the ICE being as quiet as running on battery alone.

I probably won't actually own a Tucson until the mid-to-end of next year, but I am dreaming about it already. (And this from someone who generally is not all that into vehicles.) My Honda Civics have served me well over the years, but what an upgrade the Tucson will be.

Joy,
Lynn
 

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Lynn:
70 something guy here and have to say the Tucson PHEV is my all time favorite! That is against a 50 plus year field of previous Mercedes, rotary engine Mazda, Volvo, Toyota, Honda, Acura, Nissan Z and Hyundai. Go for it!
 

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My primary question remaining is whether the vehicle is a lot louder when using the ICE than when operating solely under battery power.
I can confirm it is NOT "a lot louder", though I suppose it's a case of "in the 'ears' of the beholder"!

We have the HEV (not the PHEV), but when you put your foot into the accelerator, unless it radically shifts down, the noise increase is barely noticeable. On occasion when it downshifts a couple of cogs (but honestly, only when I'm passing on a 2-lane highway or trying to "squirt" into a hole in traffic), yes, you might well hear the engine, but it's short-lived.

Since the PHEV has a stronger battery/motor, I expect you'd get more electrical boost under load and therefore, much less chance of such radical downshifts.

This 2022 Tucson HEV is the most refined-driving and quietest vehicle I've ever owned, with very little compromise to everyday performance (having owned 3 other Audi's and 3 BMW's).

I actually wanted the PHEV but having purchased back in May, price and availability were both completely vague for the PHEV, so we pulled the trigger on the HEV.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Hello MLS and 222cson,

The more I hear about the Tucson, the more I am drooling over it. Thank you. (By the way, 222cson, I love your moniker.)

Thanks again.

Joy,
Lynn
 

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In my experience I would say it is not alot louder to be honest it is one of the quietest vehicles I have ever owned. Unless I had the dash display to show me the gas vs electric flow I would probably not know it was switching from one to the other. The only time I do notice it is when the engine has to kick in for heating the cabin other than that there is very little noise difference I can tell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Thank you for confirming and elaborating on MLS's comments about the noise level (or lack thereof). I find it astonishing -- in a very good way -- that it is so quiet. I am really looking forward someday to driving in rural areas in my Tucson.

Joy,
Lynn
 

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Hi Mungo544,

Thanks for the pointer to the upcoming Sportage. I like its internal aesthetics, and the larger, adjacent screens are sweet. I would love for the Tucson to adopt those aspects of the Sportage. I guess time will tell.

The video left me curious about more some performance aspects of the new hybrid. According to Kia's website, it is supposed to make 39MPG combined, and have 226HP and AWD.

If the Tucson is not available when I need it, or if it gets out of my price range, the Sportage hybrid is a vehicle I would look into further.

Thanks,
Lynn
Also worthwhile keeping an eye on tax credits in deciding when to pull the trigger on purchase. Currently in US, PHEV gets a $6500 federal tax credit. There is a $1000 federal credit towards installing a level 2 charger plus $300 from my electric utility in CT. Proposed changes will reduce the credit for the Tucson PHEV.
 

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Thank you for confirming and elaborating on MLS's comments about the noise level (or lack thereof). I find it astonishing -- in a very good way -- that it is so quiet. I am really looking forward someday to driving in rural areas in my Tucson.

Joy,
Lynn
Oh, sorry - also meant to point out ... the PHEV is heavier (by a few hundred pounds) and has a smaller fuel tank than the HEV, so it has less range.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
You make some excellent points, MLS. Given my driving, I suspect that the level 1 charger would be sufficient for me, but I am definitely keeping an eye on the tax credit situation.

Thanks,
Lynn
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Oh, sorry - also meant to point out ... the PHEV is heavier (by a few hundred pounds) and has a smaller fuel tank than the HEV, so it has less range.
I don't think the range difference will be much of a problem for me. Even the PHEV has a slightly larger range than what I am used to.

I'm surprised no one else had commented about your choice of names here; that makes me all the happier that I brought it up.

Joy,
Lynn
 

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Hello Pbm,

Thank you for your response.

The price difference is not the deal breaker for me; I'm just trying to find out what the relative subjective experience of driving the two models of the Tucson.

I can't road test the PHEV because there are personal circumstances which would make catching COVID extremely dangerous both for me and for my relatives; I am therefore social isolating as much as possible. Also, the PHEV isn't even sold in my state, and it would probably be very difficult to find it in stock to test drive even in the nearby states. I am therefore considering doing something I have never done in my life: Purchasing a car without having test-driven the model I am interested in. That is why I am asking questions on this site: to make as informed a decision as possible.

I have already researched many of the pros and cons (mostly pros) of the PHEV over the HEV. What I am asking for here is information that I have been unable to ascertain in my research. On paper, the PHEV looks far superior to the HEV, but if (for example) the regenerative brakes make slowing down very jerky, I want to know about that. Also, if my current car dies (it is well maintained, but it is twelve years old and has its share of miles) and the PHEV won't be available for some time, I want to know whether I should just buy the HEV or whether it would be worth getting a loaner until I can lay hands on the PHEV.

In normal times, I would simply test drive the PHEV and then order whichever model I preferred. Unfortunately, these times are anything but normal.

Joy,
Lynn
Hey Lynn
I would think twice on buying a vehicle that can not be serviced in your home state. With todays sophisticated electronics and the return ON THE FIRST VISIT to get something fixed it could be a nightmare. I have a 2022 Hyundai Tucson Limited and love it. I have experienced no braking problems and hasn't even been a concern of mine.
I don't think the range difference will be much of a problem for me. Even the PHEV has a slightly larger range than what I am used to.

I'm surprised no one else had commented about your choice of names here; that makes me all the happier that I brought it up.

Joy,
Lynn
Hey Lynn
I would think twice on buying a vehicle that can not be serviced in your home state. With todays sophisticated electronics and the return time ON THE FIRST VISIT to get something fixed it could be a nightmare. I have a 2022 Hyundai Tucson Limited and love it. I have experienced no braking problems and hasn't even been a concern of mine.
 
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