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Sorry for the length of this post. I felt that I needed to thoroughly why I was so disappointed by the 2016 Hyundai Tucson. The good news is that I got rid of it and traded it on a good quality car.

The “check engine” light on my 2016 Tucson was on and the vehicle was running rough. The mileage was 115,000. I took it to the Pohanka Hyundai dealer in Salisbury, MD on April 26.

I was informed that there was a “misfire on coils 2 and 4.“ The service department recommended replacing the spark plugs. The bill for the plug assembly and the coil assembly was $635.00.

After driving the Tucson for approximately 1,000 miles, the check engine light appeared again. The same symptoms that prompted me to take the car in for service the first time appeared again. According to Hyundai, they “found a misfire on cylinder 2, 3, 4 . Confirmed misfire follows when moving coil 3. Cleared codes and confirmed CEL was off.” This time the bill was $335.00.

After driving 500 miles the check engine light was on again. This time Hyundai “performed compression test and engine passed. Installed new spark plug.” I was not charged for this service, although I spent several hours at the dealership waiting.

Barely 300 miles later, the light appeared again. I took the car in for service yet again. This time it was “misfire on cylinder 2, 3, 4. Called ‘techline” and advised tech to perform another compression test. Compression test passed. Recommend to replace all injectors. Installed new injector, cleared codes.” The bill this time was $1,187.00. I should have listened to my instincts and walked away from this vehicle. Instead I foolishly authorized Hyundai to make the “repairs.”

It seemed that each time I took the Tucson in for service, the problem was worse after driving the car for a while.

Less than two weeks later the check engine light appeared again. After spending over $2,100 and taking the Tucson in FOUR times, Hyundai had not fixed the problem.

This time the light was on and Tucson was overheating. I was not comfortable driving it and I was not going to go back to the Hyundai dealership and spend more money.

At the end of the day, it was my decision to continue to spend money on repairs. The dealer was not proactive in helping to repair the vehicle. The technicians did not (could not?) diagnose the problem. I would not recommend buying a Tuscon or any other Hyundai for that matter.
 

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Sorry for the length of this post. I felt that I needed to thoroughly why I was so disappointed by the 2016 Hyundai Tucson. The good news is that I got rid of it and traded it on a good quality car.

The “check engine” light on my 2016 Tucson was on and the vehicle was running rough. The mileage was 115,000. I took it to the Pohanka Hyundai dealer in Salisbury, MD on April 26.

I was informed that there was a “misfire on coils 2 and 4.“ The service department recommended replacing the spark plugs. The bill for the plug assembly and the coil assembly was $635.00.

After driving the Tucson for approximately 1,000 miles, the check engine light appeared again. The same symptoms that prompted me to take the car in for service the first time appeared again. According to Hyundai, they “found a misfire on cylinder 2, 3, 4 . Confirmed misfire follows when moving coil 3. Cleared codes and confirmed CEL was off.” This time the bill was $335.00.

After driving 500 miles the check engine light was on again. This time Hyundai “performed compression test and engine passed. Installed new spark plug.” I was not charged for this service, although I spent several hours at the dealership waiting.

Barely 300 miles later, the light appeared again. I took the car in for service yet again. This time it was “misfire on cylinder 2, 3, 4. Called ‘techline” and advised tech to perform another compression test. Compression test passed. Recommend to replace all injectors. Installed new injector, cleared codes.” The bill this time was $1,187.00. I should have listened to my instincts and walked away from this vehicle. Instead I foolishly authorized Hyundai to make the “repairs.”

It seemed that each time I took the Tucson in for service, the problem was worse after driving the car for a while.

Less than two weeks later the check engine light appeared again. After spending over $2,100 and taking the Tucson in FOUR times, Hyundai had not fixed the problem.

This time the light was on and Tucson was overheating. I was not comfortable driving it and I was not going to go back to the Hyundai dealership and spend more money.

At the end of the day, it was my decision to continue to spend money on repairs. The dealer was not proactive in helping to repair the vehicle. The technicians did not (could not?) diagnose the problem. I would not recommend buying a Tuscon or any other Hyundai for that matter.
Oh wow. You have a 6 year old car with 115k miles that had an issue. By this logic we could never buy any car ever.
 

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Welcome, Mr. -sutton. This forum focuses on only the latest gen '22-on Tucsons, and tech has really moved on from those older models. You'll do better posting your work in the general Hyundai Forum covering all Tucsons, and under their appropriate section for your year:

And I just skimmed, but both from my experience and from general diagnostics logic the customary fix for codes related to the ignition coils would not be replacing parts downstream to them especially the plugs which of course are worn at your mileage but not generally a point of failure mode by then either. Coil-On-Plug coils can have a habit of wearing out (chronic issue on a Ford-engined Mazda I had), and you might ask the mechanics why their persistence not to attend to the coils themselves. You go long enough with a misfiring cylinder dumping raw fuel into the exhaust and you'll puke a t catelytic converter, and now you're talking some bucks. It could be a parts supply problem with some parts they really need and they don't want to lose a chance for at least some sort of repair charge(s).
And it's not Hyundai that keeps failing you. It's the dealer, and they're not the same thing. An established mom n pops shop that's respected and retained its mechs through the pandemic will possess more intel (and common sense) on your 6-yo car than apparently that dealer. It really doesn't sound like ditching the car or boycotting an entire manufacturer is the best tack from what you've typed. Good luck.
 

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Prior GDI Tucson's are terrible, unreliable vehicles, the motor is garbage!!
Thats why the new Tucson uses dual injection, GDI plus old school port injection combined.
Trade your Tucson in for a newer one
 
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