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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Found this info on Fb ... all credit to OP, Jim Thompson:

Attn: New Tucson PHEV Owners
Your new car came with a Level 1 charging cable that doesn’t have any documentation or instructions - and its default setting is the lowest possible charge rate!
When you plug it in - you’ll probably see the number 6 displayed. That means - limit the maximum current flow to 6 amps. That will charge your car at 0.6kW in North America. If you push the button nothing happens.
Here’s how to change it:
1. Press and hold the button for about 5 seconds until the number starts blinking.
2. While it’s blinking, press and release the button repeatedly and it will cycle through 6, 8, 10 and 12.
3. When you get to the 12, press and hold the button again for about 2-3 seconds to lock in the setting.
Setting it to 12 instead of 6 tells the charger to pull 12 amps instead of 6 amps - and it doubles your charging rate. You’ll be charging at 1.2kW instead of 0.6kW and you’ll be done in half the time! (Most household circuits are capable of carrying 15 amps or more - but if you have a lot of other electric devices on the same circuit, you may have to turn some off while you charge.)
If you’re in Europe, you have 220V - so you’ll see the 1.2kW rate when the charger is set to 6 - and you too can double your rate - to 2.4kW if you change the charger setting to 12!
I haven’t found this information in any of the manuals so hopefully this post will help save future owners from charging cycles that are twice as long as necessary!
Extra information:
The actual rate that your car is charging at will be displayed on the instrument panel if you open the front door. It will show you how much time it will take to get to 100% at the current rate of charge - and underneath, it will show you the current rate of charge (probably 1.2kW).
Your Tucson PHEV has a battery capacity of 13.8kWH. If your car says you have 50% battery, then you need to put 6.9kWH in. Divide 6.9kWH by your charging rate (1.2kW) and that will give you the number of hours you need to charge at that rate to get to 100%! (5.75 hours). I usually just let the car do the math for me.
 

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Found this info on Fb ... all credit to OP, Jim Thompson:

Attn: New Tucson PHEV Owners
Your new car came with a Level 1 charging cable that doesn’t have any documentation or instructions - and its default setting is the lowest possible charge rate!
When you plug it in - you’ll probably see the number 6 displayed. That means - limit the maximum current flow to 6 amps. That will charge your car at 0.6kW in North America. If you push the button nothing happens.
Here’s how to change it:
1. Press and hold the button for about 5 seconds until the number starts blinking.
2. While it’s blinking, press and release the button repeatedly and it will cycle through 6, 8, 10 and 12.
3. When you get to the 12, press and hold the button again for about 2-3 seconds to lock in the setting.
Setting it to 12 instead of 6 tells the charger to pull 12 amps instead of 6 amps - and it doubles your charging rate. You’ll be charging at 1.2kW instead of 0.6kW and you’ll be done in half the time! (Most household circuits are capable of carrying 15 amps or more - but if you have a lot of other electric devices on the same circuit, you may have to turn some off while you charge.)
If you’re in Europe, you have 220V - so you’ll see the 1.2kW rate when the charger is set to 6 - and you too can double your rate - to 2.4kW if you change the charger setting to 12!
I haven’t found this information in any of the manuals so hopefully this post will help save future owners from charging cycles that are twice as long as necessary!
Extra information:
The actual rate that your car is charging at will be displayed on the instrument panel if you open the front door. It will show you how much time it will take to get to 100% at the current rate of charge - and underneath, it will show you the current rate of charge (probably 1.2kW).
Your Tucson PHEV has a battery capacity of 13.8kWH. If your car says you have 50% battery, then you need to put 6.9kWH in. Divide 6.9kWH by your charging rate (1.2kW) and that will give you the number of hours you need to charge at that rate to get to 100%! (5.75 hours). I usually just let the car do the math for me.
This should be a great help!(y) Thanks
 

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Thanks a lot for this! Is there any potential downside to making that change? Could it affect the longevity of the battery? I'm wondering why they default it to the slowest rate?
 

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2022Tucson "Blue" Titanium White/ Black
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It's probably for safety reasons. I wouldn't set it to 12 amps on a 15 amp circuit unless I was sure the circuit wasn't being used by another device. I would use an outlet with a correctly wired 20 amp breaker. If you have an attached garage or a detached garage with a separate breaker box, it would be an inexpensive project to run a dedicated 20 amp circuit with a ground fault or arc fault breaker for charging your hybrid.
 

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Found this info on Fb ... all credit to OP, Jim Thompson:

Attn: New Tucson PHEV Owners
Your new car came with a Level 1 charging cable that doesn’t have any documentation or instructions - and its default setting is the lowest possible charge rate!
When you plug it in - you’ll probably see the number 6 displayed. That means - limit the maximum current flow to 6 amps. That will charge your car at 0.6kW in North America. If you push the button nothing happens.
Here’s how to change it:
1. Press and hold the button for about 5 seconds until the number starts blinking.
2. While it’s blinking, press and release the button repeatedly and it will cycle through 6, 8, 10 and 12.
3. When you get to the 12, press and hold the button again for about 2-3 seconds to lock in the setting.
Setting it to 12 instead of 6 tells the charger to pull 12 amps instead of 6 amps - and it doubles your charging rate. You’ll be charging at 1.2kW instead of 0.6kW and you’ll be done in half the time! (Most household circuits are capable of carrying 15 amps or more - but if you have a lot of other electric devices on the same circuit, you may have to turn some off while you charge.)
If you’re in Europe, you have 220V - so you’ll see the 1.2kW rate when the charger is set to 6 - and you too can double your rate - to 2.4kW if you change the charger setting to 12!
I haven’t found this information in any of the manuals so hopefully this post will help save future owners from charging cycles that are twice as long as necessary!
Extra information:
The actual rate that your car is charging at will be displayed on the instrument panel if you open the front door. It will show you how much time it will take to get to 100% at the current rate of charge - and underneath, it will show you the current rate of charge (probably 1.2kW).
Your Tucson PHEV has a battery capacity of 13.8kWH. If your car says you have 50% battery, then you need to put 6.9kWH in. Divide 6.9kWH by your charging rate (1.2kW) and that will give you the number of hours you need to charge at that rate to get to 100%! (5.75 hours). I usually just let the car do the math for me.
Thanks Jim,
Simple procedure and it works perfectly !
Don't understand that the HYUNDAI USER MANUAL is unable to explain as clearly as you did in very simple words !
You saved me a lot of slow charging hours

André
 

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2022 Hyundai Tucson Hybrid SEL Convenience (wife's daily)
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I'd say go for 12 AMPs. Should there be other devices on the circuit using 3 or more, it'll simply trip the circuit breaker. If so, try 10 AMPs, rinse and repeat. No real safety concern. That's what breakers are for.
 

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Thanks a lot for this! Is there any potential downside to making that change? Could it affect the longevity of the battery? I'm wondering why they default it to the slowest rate?
I believe from a little google research that charging batteries slowly improves their longevity. Though there does seem to be some conflicting info about this. I find use in the adjustable charging rates in the following ways. If I want to charge overnight when electricity is cheaper, I adjust the current accordingly so I don't have to get up in the middle of the night to stop charging. I don't want to reach 100% because I believe again it affects longevity. When I'm at work, where they wired me in my own socket, I can increase the current to get close to 100% by the day's end. I like toying with the variability to meet my goals. Some people don't want this hassle and just want to charge ASAP. That's fine too, I don't know what the longevity difference is. Maybe it's negligible! As well as being able to change the current from the supplied cable, you can change it from the car's PHEV on board screen. There are 3 settings, maximum, reduced, and minimum. I want to know whether this still draws the same current from the wall but just slows it down before it reaches the battery. The cable current display doesn't change so probably that is what happens.
 

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2022 Tucson SEL FWD Amazon Grey Convenience/Premium/Cargo Pkgs
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Following a few "rules" will absolutely extend battery life. How much it extends it can be debated.

Rapid charging creates heat and degrades the battery more than slower charging. I would be surprised if charging at 6 amps was any real difference than 12 amps however in that regard, but if time isn't the issue I suppose 6 amps is "better."

Charging between about 20% and 80% extends the useful life more than letting it get closer to zero and closer to 100%.

Do not "top off" Unless actually needed don't charge the battery every day after using it just to keep it at a high level that will wear out a battery sooner.

Where people get too concerned about this is thinking that means never. If you are on a trip, yes charge it to 100% to get the range you need. Or if charging stations are not always near you on a trip, yes you may need to top off sometimes. Same for rapid charging, being at home there probably is little reason to fast charge, but on a trip there may be.
 

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W/apologies since I'm the FNG, let me clarify some things and then add to help others:

Thanks a lot for this! Is there any potential downside to making that change? Could it affect the longevity of the battery? I'm wondering why they default it to the slowest rate?
No, it can't hurt the battery. It's more to support electric code and user lack of education and understanding. As you'll see shortly.

I'd say go for 12 AMPs. Should there be other devices on the circuit using 3 or more, it'll simply trip the circuit breaker. If so, try 10 AMPs, rinse and repeat. No real safety concern. That's what breakers are for.
Do as you want, obviously, but that's not code compliant or reasonably safe. I'll jump into that in a minute.

Tampa8:
Yep, pretty much.

All:
What that button is doing is setting what's called a "pilot signal". it does NOT tell the car how fast to charge. The car's on-board charger does that. A Pilot Signal tells the cars on-board charger what the maximum amperage your circuit can safely flow is. As a general statement the on-board system will reduce charge rate, generally someplace between 80 and 90%, if the mfg believes it needed. This varies by mfg, battery system, and power being delivered. The important thing to know here is we're talking about relatively low power rates. Charge rate management is much more commonly found at DC fast chargers. We're just not talking about much power here, so...

NEC code has a lot aspects, nor do I want to play home inspector. Two generalizations you should know:

1) You are expected (code requires you) to never exceed 80% of the circuits maximum safe capacity for any "continous use" device. Dryers, ranges, A/C, and EV charger all qualify and are explicitly called out in NEC code.
2) EV charging is really supposed to be done on a dedicated circuit. This as otherwise somebody might elect to charge say 12a on a 15a circuit that has multiple drops and say to themselves "that's what a breaker is for". (no it's not).

Do what you want, I care not, but if you think about this you can better tell why H/K gave you some adjustability. A 15 amp circuit (smallest common 120v and 220/240v) derated by 20% is 12A. That's why 12a is sorta the default EVSE supplied for most PHEV's.

Code basically requires you (interpreting it gets tricky) to understand and manage EVSE charge rates such that you don't exceed the 80% rule. H/K, knowing (I'm assuming) some guy's are gonna use existing wiring with multiple drops defaults to a pretty low power setting. Sort of "small hair dryer/soldering iron/small air compressor" power levels. If you want to move up so be it, but you'll likely have a hard time suing them if you over-heat the house wiring and start a fire.

Now look, there isn't ANYTHING wrong with using these higher rates. Just know what's what and make an informed decision about how you want to handle code compliance, risk management, etc.. In a moment I'll tell you about getting even more off the ranch. At this moment I'm only explaining how code works (generally), how EVSE's work (crudely), and trying to put some puzzle pieces together for anybody that might care.

My best to you all,

-d
 

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So let's move into charging faster at home.

For simplicity let's pretend we're talking about a "1" power factor so we can use easy math. That said:
  • 120V x 6 amps = 720 watts or .72kw (little numbers)
  • 120V x 12a = 1440w / 1.44kw (Still childs plays, so no, no impact to battery. Or even close)

(Note right off the bat the threads original post quoted bad math)

Some homes are wired with 20 amp circuits (that's 12/3 wire vs. 14/3 for a 15 circuit) and associated breakers. That could run to 16A, although L1 EVSE's at that rate are somewhat rare. Pretty common on an aftermarket unit though.

But if we double the voltage we double the KW delivered without any increase in amperage (or wire size). Ergo a 14/3 wire and breaker could support a 240V/15 amp breaker.

* 240V x 12a is 2.88 Kw. (much better. Still slow enough few mfg's will rate shape that, and none would do it below 80%. No need to care either, the car will handle it if the Mfg battery design needs it (unlikely).

Generally you can play this game to around 30amps. Here, at 7.2kw, most PHEV's and some EV's limit there A/C residential charging. Some earlier. Not all, some Tesla's take more, but you get the idea. By this power level you're likely going to see some rate shaping over 80% charge too.

Converting to 240V is a common thing for most of the PHEV/EV's in use today. I don't know about the H/K EVSE, but every factory EVSE I've seen is an international EVSE. Which means it would take 240V right out of the box if you knew how.

At this moment I run a factory mopar EVSE on my pacifica PHEV at 240V. I recharge in under 3 hours (as I recall, don't watch it anymore). I'll add a link to some info on how to do that in a moment.

Obviously this implies something off the ranch. I'm certainly running wiring and breakers to code (I have a 240V 30 amp breaker in my garage), but I'm playing fast and loose with an EVSE adapter. On the other hand I tell myself I well understand code and electricity, so I've talked myself into thinking I've made an informed risk managed decision. Nor have I exceeded the homes wiring, EVSE, or car's design capabilities.

YMMV, but for me cutting the charge time down that far was worth the $50 I spent. More when I dig up the documents I did on how to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Here you go:

Parts list, step by step instructions, pics, etc.


USE AT YOUR OWN RISK!!

IF YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND ELECTRICITY I WOULD NOT DO THIS.

I DO NOT KNOW IF THE H/K EVSE IS INTERNATIONAL!
Many thanks! I currently only have an HEV but when (if?) the Ioniq 5 I have on order actually gets delivered, I might need to put this to good use.

Regardless, it's always gratifying @dafish to come across someone who actually knows something and is contributing significantly to the forum - thanks again!!!
 
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Here you go:

Parts list, step by step instructions, pics, etc.


USE AT YOUR OWN RISK!!

IF YOU DON'T UNDERSTAND ELECTRICITY I WOULD NOT DO THIS.

I DO NOT KNOW IF THE H/K EVSE IS INTERNATIONAL!
So the factory trickle charger is ok with 110v on the neutral leg input? Will it change its functioning numbers and is it rated UL rating ok to do this?
 

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That's the root of the unknown. The Leaf, Bolt, Pacifica, etc all work exactly this way and it's a common mod in those circles. The key in "multi-national" or "international" capable. Does it work here? I don't know. If you don't, and/or the EVSE doesn't have something stamped on it stating it's input voltage I'd be reluctant to try it.

Load a pic of the specs stamped onto the unit and I'll see if I can tell anything from that.
 
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