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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello-
I've ordered a 2022 SEL Tucson PHEV. This vehicle's engine is new this year. I'm curious to know if anyone has information on the reliability reports or how it was tested. My understanding is that it's the base workhorse 1.6 liter plus a turbocharger (great increase of heat plus the concerns of turbo failure) with the added complexity of the Continuously Variable Valve Timing (CVVT). There's a lot of highly complex moving parts in this engine. Can someone say something to make me feel better about the prospective reliability of this engine?

I really want to have this car for 15-20 years so this is important to me.
 

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That's why I leased mine. The cvvd continuous variable valve duration is pretty complicated. It is different than Continuously Variable Valve Timing. The cvvd camshaft consist of dozens of small parts and an electric actuator motor rather than other camshafts that are one piece. Time will tell.
 

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Hello-
I've ordered a 2022 SEL Tucson PHEV. This vehicle's engine is new this year. I'm curious to know if anyone has information on the reliability reports or how it was tested. My understanding is that it's the base workhorse 1.6 liter plus a turbocharger (great increase of heat plus the concerns of turbo failure) with the added complexity of the Continuously Variable Valve Timing (CVVT). There's a lot of highly complex moving parts in this engine. Can someone say something to make me feel better about the prospective reliability of this engine?

I really want to have this car for 15-20 years so this is important to me.
70 something guy here, so I'd be very happy if i am still driving in 20 years...no less still with my '22PHEV. I've been buying Hyundai's since about 2005 for myself and family members. I figure if the manufacturer is willing to give a 100k powertrain warranty they must be pretty confident about reliability. Add a bumper to bumper 120k service plan for $1500, and not much to worry about. I admit that buying a first year new model goes against my preferences, but there were other considerations. We are far past my early days when you could get a binder and tear down your VW engine in the driveway. However, we didn't get 100k miles without a tuneup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That's why I leased mine. The cvvd continuous variable valve duration is pretty complicated. It is different than Continuously Variable Valve Timing. The cvvd camshaft consist of dozens of small parts and an electric actuator motor rather than other camshafts that are one piece. Time will tell.
Thanks for the reply and for the information. I may have misunderstood or be misinformed but my understanding is that the Smartstream engine was a CVVT design which I now feel more comfortable with. Having worked my career in engineering and trying to get inside the engineering manager’s head I’ve arrived at the following philosophy: this engine was mated to the electric motor so that under load the motor relieves pressure so that the engine shouldn’t exceed some maximum level of it’s design criteria (probably about 70%). Of course this is conjecture but it’s the best way I can make sense of an engine this size in a vehicle this large. Regardless, I’m looking forward to getting my new Tucson and seeing the world.
 

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Thanks for the reply and for the information. I may have misunderstood or be misinformed but my understanding is that the Smartstream engine was a CVVT design which I now feel more comfortable with. Having worked my career in engineering and trying to get inside the engineering manager’s head I’ve arrived at the following philosophy: this engine was mated to the electric motor so that under load the motor relieves pressure so that the engine shouldn’t exceed some maximum level of it’s design criteria (probably about 70%). Of course this is conjecture but it’s the best way I can make sense of an engine this size in a vehicle this large. Regardless, I’m looking forward to getting my new Tucson and seeing the world.
CVVT is a simpler setup. Each cam lobe has 2 stages, high or low, and oil pressure changes which lobe the valves contact. CVVD uses a multi component cam that mechanically changes the amount of time the valves remain open by varying the centerline of the cam lobes, which are separate from the shaft rather than a one piece camshaft. An electric motor moves the cam lobes back and forth to change how long the valves stay open and the separate shaft stays fixed in the cam bearings. It is infinitely variable, rather than just two stage, which gives it more power and torque, better fuel economy and lower emissions, according to Hyundai.. The guy in the video gives a great explanation. Your idea about the combined power is kind of the reverse of what you say, in a way. You always start with the electric motor. It replaces the torque converter in the automatic transmission. If you feather the "gas" pedal, you can stay on the electric motor until the hybrid battery reaches a low enough discharge. Then the gas motor kicks in to provide power to move the car and charge the batteries. The gas motor will kick in to provide extra power when you press the "gas " pedal far enough to exceed the limits of the 50 hp electric motor. That is why you can cruise on the highway at up to 70mph on electric power because you don't need as much horsepower to maintain the higher speed. If you switch to Power mode you will get a more aggressive combination of the gas and electric motors and much quicker acceleration, especially at lower speeds, but your fuel economy will suffer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
CVVT is a simpler setup. Each cam lobe has 2 stages, high or low, and oil pressure changes which lobe the valves contact. CVVD uses a multi component cam that mechanically changes the amount of time the valves remain open by varying the centerline of the cam lobes, which are separate from the shaft rather than a one piece camshaft. An electric motor moves the cam lobes back and forth to change how long the valves stay open and the separate shaft stays fixed in the cam bearings. It is infinitely variable, rather than just two stage, which gives it more power and torque, better fuel economy and lower emissions, according to Hyundai.. The guy in the video gives a great explanation. Your idea about the combined power is kind of the reverse of what you say, in a way. You always start with the electric motor. It replaces the torque converter in the automatic transmission. If you feather the "gas" pedal, you can stay on the electric motor until the hybrid battery reaches a low enough discharge. Then the gas motor kicks in to provide power to move the car and charge the batteries. The gas motor will kick in to provide extra power when you press the "gas " pedal far enough to exceed the limits of the 50 hp electric motor. That is why you can cruise on the highway at up to 70mph on electric power because you don't need as much horsepower to maintain the higher speed. If you switch to Power mode you will get a more aggressive combination of the gas and electric motors and much quicker acceleration, especially at lower speeds, but your fuel economy will suffer.
Ahh! Yes. That makes sense. Thank you. I’m having to invert my thinking in the EV world.
As long as I have you in a talking mood, what’s this I hear about carbon build-up on intake valves at 30k-40k miles and that it’s a non-covered maintenance expense?
CVVT is a simpler setup. Each cam lobe has 2 stages, high or low, and oil pressure changes which lobe the valves contact. CVVD uses a multi component cam that mechanically changes the amount of time the valves remain open by varying the centerline of the cam lobes, which are separate from the shaft rather than a one piece camshaft. An electric motor moves the cam lobes back and forth to change how long the valves stay open and the separate shaft stays fixed in the cam bearings. It is infinitely variable, rather than just two stage, which gives it more power and torque, better fuel economy and lower emissions, according to Hyundai.. The guy in the video gives a great explanation. Your idea about the combined power is kind of the reverse of what you say, in a way. You always start with the electric motor. It replaces the torque converter in the automatic transmission. If you feather the "gas" pedal, you can stay on the electric motor until the hybrid battery reaches a low enough discharge. Then the gas motor kicks in to provide power to move the car and charge the batteries. The gas motor will kick in to provide extra power when you press the "gas " pedal far enough to exceed the limits of the 50 hp electric motor. That is why you can cruise on the highway at up to 70mph on electric power because you don't need as much horsepower to maintain the higher speed. If you switch to Power mode you will get a more aggressive combination of the gas and electric motors and much quicker acceleration, especially at lower speeds, but your fuel economy will suffer.
Ah!Yes. That makes sense. I’m having trouble inverting my thinking in the EV world. Thank you for your help.
As long as I have you in a talking mood would you be willing to share what you know about carbon build up in the 1.6 liter turbo engine? Is this something I should plan for in my periodic maintenance schedule?
 

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It has to do with the direct injection. For one, it decreases the effectiveness of fuel detergents cleaning of valves, which causes the carbon buildup, so keeping up with spark plug changes, air filters etc. at recommended intervals is important. The Hyundai fuel system cleaner helps keep injectors as clean as possible, which helps keep things running better, but rather than having the dealer do it buy a bunch of Chevron Techron fuel system cleaner when it is on sale, it is the EXACT SAME stuff as Hyundai's at half the price. 10 ounces every 3000 miles is what I am doing, I think Hyundai says every oil change. Also, some direct injection engines have problems with oil dilution, so just to be safe I am changing my oil every 3750 miles instead of the recommended 7500. The oil is thin enough as it is, (0-20). It only comes as synthetic so it is good that Hyundai pays for the recommended oil changes.
 

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It has to do with the direct injection. For one, it decreases the effectiveness of fuel detergents cleaning of valves, which causes the carbon buildup, so keeping up with spark plug changes, air filters etc. at recommended intervals is important. The Hyundai fuel system cleaner helps keep injectors as clean as possible, which helps keep things running better, but rather than having the dealer do it buy a bunch of Chevron Techron fuel system cleaner when it is on sale, it is the EXACT SAME stuff as Hyundai's at half the price. 10 ounces every 3000 miles is what I am doing, I think Hyundai says every oil change. Also, some direct injection engines have problems with oil dilution, so just to be safe I am changing my oil every 3750 miles instead of the recommended 7500. The oil is thin enough as it is, (0-20). It only comes as synthetic so it is good that Hyundai pays for the recommended oil changes.
So (please pardon my ignorance but) how does Techron differ from Gumout or Royal Purple or STP types of fuel injector cleaners?
 

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It's been a while now, but when I worked as a dealership tech, all we used was Techron fuel additives. It was on the Mercedes Benz approved list at the Benz dealership I worked at. At the time BMW also recommended it, as did some of the other oem's. It's also the product used in the additive package that Chevron and Texaco use in their top tier gas. I've used it in my own cars for years. I've also read that Hyundai's fuel additive is just rebranded Techron, so that's what I've used in our 2016 Sonata Hybrid.
 

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it does appear from the manual that the use of Top Tier gasoline is sufficient relative to additives.
It should be if you always use top tier gas. I don't, though I try to when possible. So a bottle of Techron twice a year or so is just some added insurance.
 

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Fortunately Costco is very convenient so that is my regular gas station. It is reportedly very good quality gas.

Higher Quality Gasoline...
Several automobile manufacturers recommend the use of TOP TIER™ gasoline to maintain optimal performance. Costco is listed as a TOP TIER™ gasoline retailer. Find out more at www.toptiergas.com.

Kirkland Signature™ Gasoline contains five times the EPA detergent requirement in both regular unleaded and premium grades, and is formulated to clean your engine and help your vehicle run like new.

As our valued member, you expect Costco to always offer the finest quality products at the best possible price. Our fuel is no exception. Costco has closely studied fuel additives and engine deposits, and conducted extensive engine tests at nationally-recognized laboratories. Accordingly, we decided to increase the detergent additives in our fuel to provide a better value to our members.
 
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